Data Science MD Discusses Health IT at Shady Grove

For its June meetup, Data Science MD explored a new venue, The Universities at Shady Grove. And what better way to venture into Montgomery County than to spend an evening discussing one of its leading sectors. That's right, an event all about healthcare. And we tackled it from two different sides.

http://www.youtube.com/playlist?v=PLgqwinaq-u-Ob2qS9Rt8uCXeKtT830A7e&w=640&h=385

The night started with a presentation from Gavin O'Brien from NIST's National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence. He spoke about creating a secure mobile Health IT platform that would allow doctors and nurses to share relevant pieces of information in a manner that is secure and follows all guidelines and policies set forth documenting how health data must be handled. Gavin's presentation focused on securing 802.11 links as opposed to cellular links or other types of wireless links as this is a good first step and is immediately practical when deployed within one building like a hospital. Gavin discussed all of the technological challenges, from encrypting data during transmission rather than in the clear where it can be intercepted as well as creating Access Control Lists so that only the correct people saw a patient's data. As his talk progressed, one thought was constantly in the back of my mind: how can this architecture be put in place to provide the protection for the data that the policies stipulate while still allowing the data to be distributed so that analytics can be run on the data? For instance, a hospital should be interested in trends among patients in their care like if patients had complications all after receiving the same family of drugs or specific drug (perhaps from the same batch), when patients have the most problems and therefore require the most attention and when a bacteria or virus may be loose in the hospital, further complicating patients ailments. The architecture may allow these types of analytics but they were not specifically discussed during Gavin's presentation. If you have any ideas how a compliant architecture can support these analytics or potential problems to running analytics, please provide a comment to this post.

The final speaker of the night was Uma Ahluwalia, the Director of Health and Human Services for Montgomery County. Uma spoke about the various different avenues that county residents have to report problems and that often times, their needs cross many different segments of health and human services, usually requires their stories to be retold each time. According to her vision, a resident/patient could report their problem to any one of six segments and then all of the segments could see the information without the patient having to reiterate their story over and over again. One big problem with this solution is that data would be shared across many groups, giving county workers access to more information than they should according to health regulations. However, Montgomery County sees each segment as a part of one organization, and therefore the data can be shared internally among all employees within that organization. While this should help with reducing the amount of time patients need to retell their story, it still does not provide an open platform for data scientists. However, Uma also had a potential solution to that problem: volunteers. Volunteers can sign non-disclosure agreements allowing them access to see patient data to help create useful analytics, thereby opening the problem space to many more minds in the hopes of creating truly revolutionary analytics. Perhaps you will be the next great mind that unlocks the meaning behind a current social issue.

Finally, Data Science MD needs to acknowledge a few key people and groups that contributed to this meetup. Mary Lowe and Melissa Marquez from the Universities at Shady Grove were instrumental in making this happen, helping to secure the room and providing the food and A/V setup. Dan Hoffman, the Chief Innovation Officer for Montgomery County also provided a great deal of support to make this happen. Finally, John Rumble, a DSMD member, took the lead in getting DSMD beyond the Baltimore/Columbia corridor. Thanks so much to all of these key people.

If you want to catch up on previous meetups, please check out our YouTube channel.

Please check our July meetup where we discuss analysis techniques in Python and R at Betamore.