Weekly Round-Up: Data Scientists, Startups, Big Data Leaders, and Einstein

Welcome back to the round-up, an overview of the most interesting data science, statistics, and analytics articles of the past week. This week, we have 4 fascinating articles ranging in topics from data scientists job descriptions to contrasting big data and genius. In this week's round-up:

  • It's a Bird! It's a Plane! No, It's Just a Data Scientist.
  • Meet the Startups Making Machine Learning an Elementary Affair
  • What the Companies Winning at Big Data Do Differently
  • What Would Big Data Think of Einstein?

It's a Bird! It's a Plane! No, It's Just a Data Scientist.

This week, we start off with a Smart Data Collective article about how typical data scientist job descriptions tend to be composed of an unrealistic wishlist of things the hiring organization thinks a data scientist is. The article mentions how the term data scientist is very unclear in nature and how it is made up of at least two roles - data management and data analytics - both of which take up a substantial amount of a person's time.

Meet the Startups Making Machine Learning an Elementary Affair

Next up, we have a GigaOM article about startups that are trying to make machine learning tools that business users can use. The article lists 5 startups and talks a little about what each one does and what they're trying to produce.

What the Companies Winning at Big Data Do Differently

This Bloomberg article examines a survey done by Tata Consulting Services on large companies with substantial investments in big data technologies and explains what the differences are between companies that are getting a high return on these investments and companies that are not.

What Would Big Data Think of Einstein?

Our final article this week is a BBC piece that asks the question what happens to genius and big ideas in a world where big data gets so much attention. The author says that coming up with answers becomes relatively easy once you have the data and you know what you want to measure. The problem with this is that it focuses on looking backward and not the creativity and imagination it takes to look toward the future.

That's it for this week. Make sure to come back next week when we’ll have some more interesting articles! If there's something we missed, feel free to let us know in the comments below.

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