Thoughts on the INFORMS Business Analytics Conference

This post, from DC2 President Harlan Harris, was originally published on his blog. Harlan was on the board of WINFORMS, the local chapter of the Operations Research professional society, from 2012 until this summer. Earlier this year, I attended the INFORMS Conference on Business Analytics & Operations Research, in Boston. I was asked beforehand if I wanted to be a conference blogger, and for some reason I said I would. This meant I was able to publish posts on the conference's WordPress web site, and was also obliged to do so!

Here are the five posts that I wrote, along with an excerpt from each. Please click through to read the full pieces:

Operations Research, from the point of view of Data Science

  • more insight, less action — deliverables tend towards predictions and storytelling, versus formal optimization
  • more openness, less big iron — open source software leads to a low-cost, highly flexible approach
  • more scruffy, less neat — data science technologies often come from black-box statistical models, vs. domain-based theory
  • more velocity, smaller projects — a hundred $10K projects beats one $1M project
  • more science, less engineering — both practitioners and methods have different backgrounds
  • more hipsters, less suits — stronger connections to the tech industry than to the boardroom
  • more rockstars, less teams — one person can now (roughly) do everything, in simple cases, for better or worse

What is a “Data Product”?

DJ Patil says “a data product is a product that facilitates an end goal through the use of data.” So, it’s not just an analysis, or a recommendation to executives, or an insight that leads to an improvement to a business process. It’s a visible component of a system. LinkedIn’s People You May Know is viewed by many millions of customers, and it’s based on the complex interactions of the customers themselves.

Healthcare (and not Education) at INFORMS Analytics

[A]s a DC resident, we often hear of “Healthcare and Education” as a linked pair of industries. Both are systems focused on social good, with intertwined government, nonprofit, and for-profit entities, highly distributed management, and (reportedly) huge opportunities for improvement. Aside from MIT Leaders for Global Operations winning the Smith Prize (and a number of shoutouts to academic partners and mentors), there was not a peep from the education sector at tonight’s awards ceremony. Is education, and particularly K-12 and postsecondary education, not amenable to OR techniques or solutions?

What’s Changed at the Practice/Analytics Conference?

In 2011, almost every talk seemed to me to be from a Fortune 500 company, or a large nonprofit, or a consulting firm advising a Fortune 500 company or a large nonprofit. Entrepeneurship around analytics was barely to be seen. This year, there are at least a few talks about Hadoop and iPhone apps and more. Has the cost of deploying advanced analytics substantially dropped?

Why OR/Analytics People Need to Know About Database Technology

It’s worthwhile learning a bit about databases, even if you have no decision-making authority in your organization, and don’t feel like becoming a database administrator (good call). But by getting involved early in the data-collection process, when IT folks are sitting around a table arguing about platform questions, you can get a word in occasionally about the things that matter for analytics — collecting all the data, storing it in a way friendly to later analytics, and so forth.

All in all, I enjoyed blogging the conference, and recommend the practice to others! It's a great way to organize your thoughts and to summarize and synthesize your experiences.